Co-editing and conversation

I found out today that Microsoft has finally added live co-editing to Word.  In Word 2010, you can have several people working in the same document simultaneously, seeing each other’s edits live as you go.

On the one hand, this is a useful and interesting feature.  I confess, I’d be more impressed if we hadn’t implemented more or less exactly this functionality at one of my earlier startups (Buzzpad) all the way back in 2002; I’m a little distressed by the fact that it’s taken MS this long to catch on.  But be that as it may, it’s still useful.

That said, I suspect that the process is going to turn out to be a bit weak.  (Caveat: I haven’t played with it yet, so I’m going by what the above post says.)  The reason is that they appear to have failed to think about the conversational nature of the interaction.

The thing is, when three of us are co-editing a document, we’re not doing so in isolation.  The co-editing is, usually, an interactive process, where each of us is reviewing each other’s changes, commenting on and tweaking them, and generally bouncing ideas off each other.  Sure, we can each edit in our own little silos, but that’s nowhere near as interesting and useful as a more interactive experience.

So we need to have a conversation as part of this.  As currently constituted, it looks like we need to do that out-of-band.  Microsoft would probably recommend opening up a Messenger conversation for it, and that works, but it’s not a great solution: it loses the document’s context, and the conversation is not itself preserved with the document, so it’s harder to go back later and reconstruct why you made the decisions you did.  As it stands, I suspect that I’ll wind up horribly abusing Word’s comment features to hold in-line conversations.

Moreover, this doesn’t do enough for the asynchronous side of the conversation.  In practice, we’ll usually be editing this document for a while; when I go away and come back, I want to clearly see the changes.  Moreover, I want to see the conversations that led up to those changes, so I can understand them properly.  You can get a bit of this with some of Word’s other features, but it doesn’t look well-integrated.

My guess is that MS decided to finally implement this capability because Wave scared them, and I have to say that I’m disappointed that they didn’t really learn from Wave: this is a comparatively naive-looking version of co-browsing.  The Wave notion, of a root blip (typically the document you’re co-editing) with deep conversations both embedded inside it and attached as later blips, takes the conversational side of co-editing much more seriously.  And the ability to quickly review all changes — both new conversation and edits to the blips — makes asynchronous conversation work pretty nicely.

So points to MS for trying, but it’s still pretty weak.  I hope they’ll keep evolving it in better directions, but I suspect that’ll only happen if the open-source Wave project continues to give them a good fright.

How about you?  Do you think you’d use Word’s new co-editing capability?  Is there anything that would make it better for you?

One Response to “Co-editing and conversation”

  1. Mark S. Says:

    From what you describe (of their description), they haven’t even caught up to Google Docs, which has built-in IM interactions into each document.

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