Archive for July, 2011

Twitter as the new chain letter

July 13, 2011

I just got the following retweet:

Help @SesameWorkshop raise money to promote #HealthyKids! For every RT of this message, @SamsClub will donate $5! Thanks for your support!

Let’s assume that this is real (it seems plausible, anyway, given what I can find online).  And granted, it looks like a good cause, and very well-intentioned.

But would anybody care to place any bets on when this chain-tweet will ever end?  Newer social media, with one-click access to resharing, does look likely to make chain letter memes even more dangerous and ever-spreading than they have been historically.

Although it does seem like an interesting challenge.  What would be the perfect chain-tweet?  It would need to tug at heartstrings, look deeply plausible, have no obvious end goal or date, and still fit into 140 characters.  The above is quite good: can folks do better?

G+: Circles vs. Identity

July 11, 2011

All the conversation about social networking right now is of course about Google+.  I’m not going to bother recapping that: most of you know about it (and I think that XKCD summed up the current state pretty well), and a lot of you are already on it.  They do a lot right, and I fully expect it to improve rapidly, but let’s talk a bit about the biggest goof that I’ve seen so far.

The big deal about Google+ is the notion of “circles”.  These aren’t nearly as revolutionary as they’re made out to be (from the thousand-foot view, they’re similar to Facebook’s Lists), but they’re unusually well-executed and well-integrated.  The key observation Google made, correctly, is that most people run in multiple circles, and that those circles need to be front-and-center to the experience, not considered a minor detail.  I put a lot of information online, and different information should be shared with different circles.

So why, for heaven’s sake, do I have only one profile?  I suspect that the answer is that they simply tied into the existing Google Profile mechanism, and that they have been too influenced by Facebook.  But seriously, it indicates that they haven’t thought their own key insight through properly.

The thing is, for many people — possibly most — circles are more than just groups of people.  It’s not just that I am sharing different things with those people, it’s that I am potentially a different person to those people.  And I don’t mean in some sinister way, I mean the routine stuff: it’s almost cliche to say that we present multiple faces to the world, and it’s kind of astonishing that that hasn’t been properly recognized.

For me personally, this is a relatively minor detail: I’ve never tried to keep much separation between the real-world Mark and the better-known nom du SCA and plume and stuff Justin.  But for a lot of people, this separation really matters.  A common example or two:

  • I have many friends who participate in alternative lifestyles of one sort or another.  For many of them, it is deathly critical that they keep that well-separated from mundane life and especially from work — in some cases, crossing those identities could be a career-ender.
  • Almost every teenager is on social networks nowadays.  And let’s get real: most of them want to maintain a clean separation between the family side of the network and the friends side.  That’s normal and healthy — modern parental paranoia aside, teens need space to learn and grow on their own.
  • One flap that’s blown up pretty seriously lately surrounds the question of gender identification.  That points up the fact that these different identities potentially don’t publicly identify the same way.  Specifically, I suspect that some of the women I know would very much like to have multiple profiles, some of which identify as female (mainly for friends) and others which are specifically gender-neutral (for public consumption).

There are other examples, but it all ties together.  Google has bought into Facebook’s dreadfully mistakenbelief that you can and should only have one identity online, that it must be associated with your real name, and that it must be shared among all your circles.  This is uncharacteristically dumb of them: there is no good argument for it, and lots of reasons — the above and more — to kill it.

So here’s a specific gauntlet thrown down to Google: get the identity equation right.  You got conversation mostly right with Wave; you’ve gotten a lot of the social interactions right with G+.  But your identity mechanism is just plain broken.  People should have the ability to have an arbitrary number of identities, and the requirement to tie those publicly to real-world identity should be just plain scrapped.

(And let’s be clear here: I’m not calling for anonymity.  Anonymity is death to most social environments online.  I am calling for pseudonymity to be officially permitted and encouraged, so that people can present the appropriate face to the appropriate circles.)

Opinions?  Do you present multiple faces to the online world?  Would you use multiple profiles, if the option existed?